How Long Does Hot Sauce Burn Last?

In this quick tutorial, we’ll address the questions “How long does hot sauce burn last?” and “Why does it burn?” We’ll also discuss what you may do to relieve the burning feeling and whether or not spicy sauces can cause skin burns.

The burn from spicy sauce lasts roughly 20 minutes on average. The length of time depends on the heat of the sauce, the heat of the chilli peppers used to prepare it, and how much of it you really consume.

Why does the hot sauce burn when consumed?

How Long Does Hot Sauce Burn LastThe burning feeling caused by hot sauce is essentially a painful experience. Capsaicin is a chemical compound found in chilli peppers. When it comes into contact with the tongue, it activates a neural pathway in the brain that causes the tongue to feel like it’s burning. So, when we consume anything and it tastes “spicy,” it’s really simply a discomfort experience.

Capsaicin may also cause a rise in stress hormones, which causes the person’s face to get red and sweat. Because you’re not really burning, it’s all a chemical reaction, yet your breath still feels like you’re blowing out fire!

Why can some people handle hot sauce while others can not?

Spicy food is consumed in large quantities by those who like it. This overburdens the temperature-sensitive pathway, causing it to get bored with repeating the same reaction. Alternatively, a person might acquire a “tolerance” to spicy foods. As a result, while someone who cannot tolerate spicy food will sweat, someone who can will enjoy their meal.

How to cool down the burning sensation from hot sauce?

So, whether you ate spicy sauce by mistake or on purpose, and now your mouth is on fire, don’t panic. To relieve the burning feeling, read the following advice:

Dairy products

Check the refrigerator for any dairy items. Milk is an excellent way to relieve the burning feeling. It has a protein called casein, which protects it from the spicy sauce’s capsaicin.

Because coconut milk, soy milk, and almond milk do not contain casein, they will not function. If milk isn’t accessible, try yoghurt or cheese, which are both milk-based products. You may even apply cream if you like.

Juice

Have a citrus juice with acidity, such as lemonade or orange juice. Because capsaicin is alkaline by nature, it will be neutralised by acidity.

Starchy foods

Capsaicin’s action may be masked using starch, or it can simply function as a barrier. Have something to eat, such as bread or rice.

Does water help in calming down the burning sensation?

When your mouth is on fire, the first thing you reach for is most likely water, but drinking water during a blistering episode of hot sauce is not a smart idea.

The reason behind this is that capsaicin is an oil-based molecule, so water will simply travel around it in your tongue. So, instead of drinking water, consider one of the above-mentioned alternatives.

Can hot sauce burn the skin?

When hot sauce or chilli peppers come into contact with your skin, they will not ‘burn’ your skin and will not cause any physical injury.

The capsaicin will just activate the same receptors as it would on the tongue, fooling your brain into thinking it’s burning when it’s truly uncomfortable.

Check out this article to see whether spicy sauce is healthy or not.

How to store hot sauce so it does not go bad?

Unopened hot sauce should be kept in a cool, dry area away from light and moisture. Keep it in the fridge after it’s been opened to preserve its freshness.

Allowing hot sauce to clump around the lip of the bottle and the top is not a good idea. This sauce will dry up and get infested with germs, which will spread throughout the sauce.

Keep it out of the sun and away from the heat. Don’t let it get too close to the burner.

Every now and then, sanitise the bottle from the outside to remove any microorganisms that might taint the sauce.

These procedures will significantly extend the shelf life of spicy sauce.

Conclusion

In this quick tutorial, we addressed the questions “How long does hot sauce burn?” and “Why does it burn?”. We also discussed what you may do to relieve the burning feeling and whether or not spicy sauce might cause skin burns.

Abeeha

Abeeha joins the Kitchen Community with decades of expertise. She is a well-known cook and a passionate gardener. Her next book, "Healthy Eating Through the Garden," will be out soon. When she's not writing or lecturing on food and gardening, Abeeha may be found wandering through farmer's markets and greenhouses seeking the next big idea.

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